Lent & Holy Week

Lent 2014
USCCB Lenten Calendar

Ash Wednesday
March 5
Masses: 12:10 pm,
5:15 pm and 7 pm
Masses during Lent
Monday (Communion Service): 5:15 pm
Tuesday & Thursday, 7:30 am
Wednesday & Friday, 12:10 pm & 5:15 pm

Saturday, 5:15 pm
Sunday, 8 & 10:30 am
Reconciliation
Every Saturday, 4 - 5 pm
2nd Friday of the month, 4-5 pm



 
Parish Lenten
Penance Service
:
Monday,
March 31, 2014
at 7 pm


 
Stations of the Cross and Benediction
Fridays in Lent: 7 pm
Other Area Penance Services
Parish Date Time
St. Mary’s,
Mexia
Tuesday,
March 18
6 pm
St. Jerome’s,
Waco
Thursday,
March 20
7 pm
St. Eugene’s,
McGregor
Thursday,
March 27
7 pm
St. Joseph’s,
Elk
Wednesday,
April 2
6:30 pm
Sacred Heart,
Waco
Thursday,
April 3
7 pm
St. Thomas,
Hamilton
Tuesday,
April 8
6 pm
Our Lady of Lourdes,
Gatesville
Tuesday,
April 8
7:30 pm
St. Louis,
Waco
Tuesday,
April 8
7 pm
St. John’s,
Waco
Wednesday,
April 9
6:30 pm
Assumption,
West
Thursday,
April 10
4-5 pm &
7-8 pm
St. Joseph’s,
Bellmead
Friday,
April 11
7 pm
St. Martin’s,
Tours
Wednesday,
April 16
3 pm
Seder Meal
Thursday, April 10, 2014
6:30 pm
Knights of Columbus
Fish Fry
Fridays of Lent, 5 - 8 pm
(except Good Friday) in the KC Hall, corner of Richland and Sanger Ave.
This Fundraiser benefits our parish graduating seniors (KC Scholarship program).

Holy Week 2014

Palm Sunday
April 13
Masses
Saturday,  5:15 pm
Sunday, 8 & 10:30 am
Holy Thursday
April 17

Mass of the Lord's Supper: 7 pm
Good Friday
April 18

Stations of the Cross: 12:10 pm
Rosary: 2:30 pm
Friday of the Passion of the Lord: 7 pm

First Day of the Divine Mercy Novena
Holy Saturday
April 19
The Easter Vigil Mass: 8:30 pm

Easter Sunday
The Resurrection of the Lord
April 20
Masses: 8 and 10:30 am

Fast and Abstinence
"This, rather, is the fasting that I wish: releasing those bound unjustly, untying the thongs of the yoke; setting free the oppressed, breaking every yoke; sharing your bread with the hungry, sheltering the oppressed and the homeless; clothing the naked when you see them, and not turning your back on your own." (Is 58)
 
One of the most ancient practices linked to the season of Lent is fasting. Fasting is not only a discipline of self-control, but also serves as an aid to prayer. Just as our bodies hunger for physical food, so too, do our souls hunger for God. By fasting we signify our oneness with the Lord, acknowledge our need for conversion and give witness to our solidarity with those less fortunate.

Traditionally, fasting means not eating more than one full meal and two smaller (half) meals. Also, there is no eating between meals. Fasting refers to the quantity of food eaten. Catholics who are 18 to 59 years old are expected to fast on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday.

Abstinence is the avoidance of meat products (not including eggs, milk and condiments made of animal fat). The U.S. Catholic bishops call for all Catholics 14 years and older to abstain from meat on Ash Wednesday, Good Friday and the Fridays of Lent. There is no upper age limit.

These traditions of fasting and abstinence are an expression of our desire to be converted in our hearts, to be reconciled with each other, and to love our neighbor.

For more information, click here.